Urban Stag

Early Civil War Kataeb Militia Staghound Mk.III.

In the early years of the Lebanese Civil War, it was a common to see vehicles continually changing owners. Here is an example of such uses and customs found in the Levant: A Staghound Mk.III which changed owners more than once. Two assumptions can be noted, the vehicle originally belonging to the Lebanese Army, was either captured by Palestinian factions and recaptured and used here on the picture by the Kataeb militia or directly used by the Kataeb  and the crew being ex-Lebanese Army soldiers. The vehicle still bears its previous owners tag on the back, which can be either “Jeish Akka” which can be translated as “Army of Acre”, or “Jeish Akkar” translated as the Army of Akkar, a region in North Lebanon. The debate is still on since the arabic letter R isn’t clearly identifiable. Further photos of this vehicle will be needed to confirm either assumption.  The vehicle was retagged with “Jeish Bayrut” or “Army of Beirut” on the front end by the new owners.

A new assumption that occurred lately, maybe the most accurate and logical one, is the explanation given by César Jachan which can be found in the comments to this article: “It can be also a vehicle owned by “Jaych Barakat”. If you look at the tag, you will note something similar to a “T” at the end, even if the whole spray tag is unclear. In 1976, some christian units of the ex-lebanese army (Barakat Army) were defending the area close to “binayit el béton” in downtown Beirut. You can see the lower part of the building, on the right side of the photo.”

Photo Credits: Vintage Images

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2 thoughts on “Urban Stag

  1. Dear Chadi,

    It can be also a vehicle owned by “Jaych Barakat”. If you look at the tag, you will note something similar to a “T” at the end, even if the whole spray tag is unclear. In 1976, some christian units of the ex-lebanese army (Barakat Army) were defending the area close to “binayit el béton” in downtown Beirut. You can see the lower part of the building, on the right side of the photo. Keep on the good work.

    Best Regards.
    César

  2. Indeed César,

    Your explanation seems to be very logical as I saw at first what looks like a T letter at the end of the second word. Since I read it as “AKKAT” I found it meaningless. Now that you presented it like that, it make sense, the letters B and R seem to sprayed in a way they appears like being a Ain letter and linked to the K letter which makes it AK… instead of BARAK…
    Thank you a lot for wise contribution.

    Best Regards,
    Chadi

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